9 Best Edgar Allan Poe Books

Edgar Allan Poe Books: Edgar Allan Poe was an American writer, poet, editor, and literary critic. Poe is best known for his poetry and short stories, particularly his tales of mystery and the macabre.  We hope you enjoy our list of the best Edgar Allan Poe Books.

Edgar Allan Poe Books

The Best Short Stories of Edgar Allan Poe by Edgar Allan Poe

This volume contains a collection of some of the best short stories ever written by Edgar Allan Poe. A master of the macabre, Poe exhibits his literary prowess in these classic short stories. Contained within this volume are the following: The Gold-Bug, The Murders in the Rue Morgue, The Balloon-Hoax, The Purloined Letter, A Descent into the Maelström, The Black Cat, The Fall of the House of Usher, The Masque of the Red Death, The Cask of Amontillado, The Pit and the Pendulum, and The Tell-Tale Heart

The Complete Works of Edgar Allan Poe by Edgar Allan Poe

Edgar Allan Poe was an American writer, editor, and literary critic. Poe is best known for his poetry and short stories, particularly his tales of mystery and the macabre.This work includes the following:The RavenThe BellsUlalumeTo HelenAnnabel LeeA ValentineAn EnigmaTo My MotherFor AnnieTo F——To Frances S. OsgoodEldoradoEulalieA Dream Within a DreamTo Marie Louise (Shew)To The SameThe City in the SeaThe SleeperBridal BalladPoems of ManhoodLenoreTo One in ParadiseThe ColiseumThe Haunted PalaceThe Conqueror WormSilenceDreamlandTo ZanteHymnScenes from PolitianPoems of YouthIntroduction (1831)To ScienceAl AaraafTamerlaneTo HelenThe Valley of UnrestIsrafelTo —— (“I heed not that my earthly lot”)To —— (“The Bowers whereat, in dreams, I see”)To the RiverSongSpirits of the DeadA DreamRomanceFairylandThe LakeEvening StarImitation”The Happiest Day”Hymn (Translation from the Greek)Dreams”In Youth I have known one”A PæanNotesDoubtful PoemsAloneTo IsadoreThe Village StreetThe Forest ReverieProse PoemsThe Island of the FayThe Power of WordsThe Colloquy of Monos and UnaThe Conversation of Eiros and CharmionShadow—a ParableSilence—a FableEssaysThe Poetic PrincipleThe Philosophy of CompositionOld English Poetry

Tales of Edgar Allan Poe by Edgar Allan Poe

One of the most original American writers, Edgar Allan Poe shaped the development of both the detectvie story and the science-fiction story. Some of his poems—”The Raven,” “The Bells,” “Annabel Lee”—remain among the most popular in American literature. Poe’s tales of the macabre still thrill readers of all ages. Here are familiar favorites like “The Purloined Letter,” “The Fall of the House of Usher,” and “The Murders in the Rue Morgue,” together with less-known masterpieces like “The Imp of the Perverse,” “The Narrative of A. Gordon Pym,” and “Ligeia,” which is now recognized as one of the first science-fiction stories, a total of seventy-three tales in all, plus fifty-three poems and a generous sampling of Poe’s essays, criticism and journalistic writings.

Darkness There: Selected Tales by Edgar Allan Poe by Edgar Allan Poe,

Edgar Allan Poe is known as the forefather of suspense and modern crime fiction. For the first time ever, Darkness There showcases some of his most famous tales with stunning digital illustrations. Each story explores a different twist of madness, murder, and melancholy, from the horror of being buried alive in “The Fall of the House of Usher” to the desperate case of two gruesome killings in “The Murders in the Rue Morgue.” The heartbeat of paranoia in “The Tell-Tale Heart,” the razor-sharp claustrophobia in “The Pit and the Pendulum,” and a mourner’s torment in “The Raven” reveal—and revel in—life’s creepiest and craziest. These tales are not for the faint of heart or the thin of skin.

Edgar Allan Poe: The Fever Called Living by Paul Collins

Looming large in the popular imagination as a serious poet and lively drunk who died in penury, Edgar Allan Poe was also the most celebrated and notorious writer of his day. He died broke and alone at the age of forty, but not before he had written some of the greatest works in the English language, from the chilling “The Tell-Tale Heart” to “The Murders in the Rue Morgue”—the first modern detective story—to the iconic poem “The Raven.”

Poe’s life was one of unremitting hardship. His father abandoned the family, and his mother died when he was three. Poe was thrown out of West Point, and married his beloved thirteen-year-old cousin, who died of tuberculosis at twenty-four. He was so poor that he burned furniture to stay warm. He was a scourge to other poets, but more so to himself.

The Raven and Other Poems by Edgar Allan Poe

One of the most famous poems in the English language, “The Raven” first appeared in the January 29, 1845, edition of the New York Evening Mirror. It brought Edgar Allan Poe, then in his mid-30s and a well-known poet, critic, and short story writer, his first taste of celebrity on a grand scale. “The Raven” remains Poe’s best-known work, yet it is only one of a dazzling series of poems and stories that won him an enduring place in world literature.
This volume contains “The Raven” and 40 others of Edgar Allan Poe’s most memorable poems, among them “The Bells,” “Ulalume,” “Israfel,” “To Helen,” “The Conqueror Worm,” “Eldorado,” and “Annabel Lee.” Together they reveal the extraordinary spectrum of Poe’s personality — his idealism; his visionary

The Selected Writings of Edgar Allan Poe by Edgar Allan Poe

An anthology of stories from Edgar Allan Poe. Includes The Fall of the House of Usher, The Tell-Tale Heart, The Cask of Amontillado, The Pit and the Pendulum, The Masque of the Red Death, The Murders in the Rue Morgue, The Purloined Letter, and The Raven. Preface gives brief biography.

The Complete Stories and Poems by Edgar Allan Poe

This single volume brings together all of Poe’s stories and poems, and illuminates the diverse and multifaceted genius of one of the greatest and most influential figures in American literary history.

The Tell-Tale Heart and Other Writings by Edgar Allan Poe

“The Tell-Tale Heart” is a short story by Edgar Allan Poe first published in 1843. It follows an unnamed narrator who insists on his sanity after murdering an old man with a “vulture eye”. The murder is carefully calculated, and the murderer hides the body by cutting it into pieces and hiding it under the floorboards. Ultimately the narrator’s guilt manifests itself in the hallucination that the man’s heart is still beating under the floorboards.It is unclear what relationship, if any, the old man and his murderer share. It has been suggested that the old man is a father figure or, perhaps, that his vulture eye represents some sort of veiled secret. The ambiguity and lack of details about the two main characters stand in stark contrast to the specific plot details leading up to the murder.The story was first published in James Russell Lowell’s The Pioneer in January 1843. “The Tell-Tale Heart” is widely considered a classic of the Gothic fiction genre and one of Poe’s most famous short stories