14 Best Education Books

Best Education Books

Educated: A Memoir by Tara Westover

Born to survivalists in the mountains of Idaho, Tara Westover was seventeen the first time she set foot in a classroom. Her family was so isolated from mainstream society that there was no one to ensure the children received an education, and no one to intervene when one of Tara’s older brothers became violent. When another brother got himself into college, Tara decided to try a new kind of life. Her quest for knowledge transformed her, taking her over oceans and across continents, to Harvard and to Cambridge University. Only then would she wonder if she’d traveled too far, if there was still a way home.

Teaching in the Online Classroom - Surviving andThriving in the New Normal by Doug Lemov

School closures in response to the covid-19 coronavirus pandemic resulted in an immediate and universal pivot to online teaching. More than 3.7 million teachers in the U.S. were suddenly asked to teach in an entirely new setting with little preparation and no advance notice. This has caused an unprecedented threat to children’s education, giving rise to an urgent need for resources and guidance. The New Normal is a just-in-time response to educators’ call for help. Teaching expert Doug Lemov and his colleagues spent weeks studying videos of online teaching and they now provide educators in the midst of this transition with a clear guide to engaging and educating their students online.  

The Breakdown of Higher Education: How It Happened, the Damage It Does, and What Can Be Done by John M. Ellis

A series of near-riots on campuses aimed at silencing guest speakers has exposed the fact that our universities are no longer devoted to the free exchange of ideas in pursuit of truth. But this hostility to free speech is only a symptom of a deeper problem, writes John Ellis.

Having watched the deterioration of academia up close for the past fifty years, Ellis locates the core of the problem in a change in the composition of the faculty during this time, from mildly left-leaning to almost exclusively leftist. He explains how astonishing historical luck led to the success of a plan first devised by a small group of activists to use college campuses to promote radical politics, and why laws and regulations designed to prevent the politicizing of higher education proved insufficient.

Evaluation and Testing in Nursing Education, Sixth Edition by Marilyn H. Oermann PhD RN ANEF FAAN

Long considered the gold standard for evaluation and testing in nursing education, the sixth edition of this classic text provides expert, comprehensive guidance in the assessment of student learning in a wide variety of settings, as well as the evaluation of instructor and program effectiveness. It presents fundamental measurement and evaluation concepts that will aid nurse educators in the design, critique, and use of appropriate tests and evaluation tools. Important social, ethical, and legal issues associated with testing and evaluation also are explored, including the prevention of cheating and academic policies for testing, grading, and progression.

Teaching for Deeper Learning: Tools to Engage Students in Meaning Making by Jay McTighe

Far too often, our students attain only a superficial level of knowledge that fails to prepare them for deeper challenges in school and beyond. In Teaching for Deeper Learning, renowned educators and best-selling authors Jay McTighe and Harvey F. Silver propose a solution: teaching students to make meaning for themselves.

Contending that the ability to “earn” understanding will equip students to thrive in school, at work, and in life, the authors highlight seven higher-order thinking skills that facilitate students’ acquisition of information for greater retention, retrieval, and transfer. These skills, which cut across content areas and grade levels and are deeply embedded in current academic standards, separate high achievers from their low-performing peers.

Teaching Students with Learning Problems by Cecil Mercer, Ann Mercer

This top-selling practical, research-based text contains the resources teachers need to make informed decisions concerning their students with learning or behavior problems, making it the most useful methods text on the market. Prided for its unique and comprehensive coverage of classroom assessment and methods for the content areas, it assists teachers in finding effective practices to facilitate instruction of students with learning problems.

The Handbook of Adult and Continuing Education by Tonette S. Rocco , M Cecil Smith

Colleges and universities are
increasingly becoming significant sites for adult education scholarship—in
large part due to demographic shifts. With fewer U.S. high school graduates on
the horizon, higher education institutions will need to attract “non-traditional”
(i.e., older) adult learners to remain viable, both financially and politically.
There is a need to develop a better corpus of scholarship on topics as diverse
as, what learning theories are useful for understanding adult learning? How are
higher education institutions changing in response to the surge of adult
students? What academic programs are providing better learning and employment
outcomes for adults in college? Adult education scholars can offer much to the
policy debates taking place in higher education.

The Knowledge Gap: The hidden cause of America's broken education system--and how to fix it by Natalie Wexler

It was only after years within the education reform movement that Natalie Wexler stumbled across a hidden explanation for our country’s frustrating lack of progress when it comes to providing every child with a quality education. The problem wasn’t one of the usual scapegoats: lazy teachers, shoddy facilities, lack of accountability. It was something no one was talking about: the elementary school curriculum’s intense focus on decontextualized reading comprehension “skills” at the expense of actual knowledge. In the tradition of Dale Russakoff’s The Prize and Dana Goldstein’s The Teacher Wars, Wexler brings together history, research, and compelling characters to pull back the curtain on this fundamental flaw in our education system–one that fellow reformers, journalists, and policymakers have long overlooked, and of which the general public, including many parents, remains unaware.

Blind Spots: Why Students Fail and the Science That Can Save Them by Kimberly Nix Berens PhD

In the United States, a majority of students graduate below proficiency in all academic subjects. Parents of struggling students feel overwhelmed and confused about how to help their children simply survive school, let alone succeed. Various school reform efforts have been tried and all have failed. But all hope is not lost. A science exists that allows children to learn as individuals even though at school they are educated in groups. One that avoids senseless labels that sentence children to lifetimes of failure and mediocrity.

Teach Like a PIRATE: Increase Student Engagement, Boost Your Creativity, and Transform Your Life as an Educator by Dave Burgess

Based on Dave Burgess’s popular “Teach Like a PIRATE” seminars, this book offers inspiration, practical techniques, and innovative ideas that will help you to increase student engagement, boost your creativity, and transform your life as an educator. You’ll learn how to: • Tap into and dramatically increase your passion as a teacher • Develop outrageously engaging lessons that draw students in like a magnet • Establish rapport and a sense of camaraderie in your classroom • Transform your class into a life-changing experience for your students This groundbreaking inspirational manifesto contains over 30 hooks specially designed to captivate your class and 170 brainstorming questions that will skyrocket your creativity. Once you learn the Teach Like a PIRATE system, you’ll never look at your role as an educator the same again.

The Law of Higher Education: Student Version by William A. Kaplin , Barbara A. Lee

Based on the sixth edition of Kaplin and Lee’s indispensable guide to the law that bears on the conduct of higher education, The Law of Higher Education, Sixth Edition: Student Version provides an up-to-date reference and guide for coursework in higher education law and programs preparing law students and higher education administrators for leadership roles.

This student edition discusses the most significant areas of the law for college and university attorneys and administrators. Each chapter is introduced by a discussion of key terms and topics the students will encounter, and the book includes materials from the full sixth edition that are most relevant to student interests and classroom instruction. It also contains a “crosswalk” that keys sections of the Student Edition to counterpart sections of the two-volume treatise.

The Amateur Hour: A History of College Teaching in America

American college teaching is in crisis, or so we are told. But we’ve heard that complaint for the past 150 years, as critics have denounced the poor quality of instruction in undergraduate classrooms. Students daydream in gigantic lecture halls while a professor drones on, or they meet with a teaching assistant for an hour of aimless discussion. The modern university does not reward teaching, so faculty members at every level neglect it in favor of research and publication.

Culturally Responsive Teaching and The Brain: Promoting Authentic Engagement and Rigor Among Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students by Zaretta L. Hammond

To close the achievement gap, diverse classrooms need a proven framework for optimizing student engagement. Culturally responsive instruction has shown promise, but many teachers have struggled with its implementation―until now.

 

In this book, Zaretta Hammond draws on cutting edge neuroscience research to offer an innovative approach for designing and implementing brain compatible culturally responsive instruction.

 

The book includes:

 

  • Information on how one’s culture programs the brain to process data and affects learning relationships
  • Ten “key moves” to build students’ learner operating systems and prepare them to become independent learners
  • Prompts for action and valuable self reflection

Diversity's Promise for Higher Education: Making It Work by Daryl G. Smith

Daryl G. Smith has devoted her career to studying and fostering diversity in higher education. In Diversity’s Promise for Higher Education, Smith brings together research from a wide variety of fields to propose a set of clear and realistic practices that will help colleges and universities locate diversity as a strategic imperative and pursue diversity efforts that are inclusive of the varied―and growing―issues apparent on campuses without losing focus on the critical unfinished business of the past.

To become more relevant to society, the nation, and the world, while remaining true to their core missions, colleges and universities must continue to see diversity―like technology―as central, not parallel, to their work. Indeed, looking at the relatively slow progress for change in many areas, Smith suggests that seeing diversity as an imperative for an institution’s individual mission, and not just as a value, is the necessary lever for real institutional change. Furthermore, achieving excellence in a diverse society requires increasing institutional capacity for diversity―working to understand how diversity is tied to better leadership, positive change, research in virtually every field, student success, accountability, and more equitable hiring practices.