Top 10 Best Books about Dark Matter

picture of space showing dark matter

Best Books about Dark Matter: Dark matter is a form of matter thought to account for approximately 85% of the matter in the universe. Its presence is implied in a variety of astrophysical observations, including gravitational effects that cannot be explained by accepted theories of gravity unless more matter is present than can be seen. For this reason, most experts think that dark matter is abundant in the universe and that it has had a strong influence on its structure and evolution. Dark matter is called dark because it does not appear to interact with the electromagnetic field, which means it does not absorb, reflect or emit electromagnetic radiation, and is therefore difficult to detect.

Best Books about Dark Matter

Dark Matter and Dark Energy: The Hidden 95% of the Universe (Hot Science) by Brian Clegg

All the matter and light we can see in the universe makes up a trivial 5 per cent of everything. The rest is hidden.

Since the 1970s, astronomers have been aware that galaxies have far too little matter in them to account for the way they spin around: they should fly apart like clay off a potter’s wheel, but something concealed holds them together. This ‘something’ is dark matter – invisible material in five times the quantity of the familiar stuff of stars and planets. By the 1990s we also knew that the expansion of the universe was accelerating. Something, named dark energy, was pushing it to expand faster and faster. Across the universe, this requires enough energy that the equivalent mass would be nearly 14 times greater than all the known material in existence.

The Dark Matter of Mona Starr by Laura Lee Gulledge

Sometimes, the world is too much for Mona Starr. She’s sweet, geeky, and creative, but it’s hard for her to make friends and connect with other people, and her depression seems to take on a vivid, concrete form. She calls it her Matter. 
 
The Matter seems to be everywhere, telling Mona she’s not good enough and that everyone around her wishes she’d go away. But with therapy, art, writing, and the persistence of a few good friends, Mona starts to understand her Matter and how she can turn her fears into strengths. 
 
Heartfelt, emotionally vulnerable, and visually stunning, The Dark Matter of Mona Starris a story about battling your inner doubts and fears—and finding your creative genius.

Dark Matter: A Century of Speculative Fiction from the African Diaspora by Sheree R. Thomas

This volume introduces black science fiction, fantasy, and speculative fiction writers to the generations of readers who have not had the chance to explore the scope and diversity among African-American writers.

Dark Matter and the Dinosaurs: The Astounding Interconnectedness of the Universe by Lisa Randall

In Dark Matter and the Dinosaurs, Professor Lisa Randall, one of today’s most influential theoretical physicists, takes readers on an intellectual adventure through the history of the cosmos, showing how events in the farthest reaches of the Universe created the conditions for life—and death—on our planet.

Sixty-six million years ago, an object the size of a city crashed into Earth, killing off the dinosaurs, along with three-quarters of the planet’s species. Challenging the usual assumptions about the simple makeup of the unseen material that constitutes 85% of the matter in the Universe, Randall explains how a disk of dark matter in the Milky Way plane might have triggered the cataclysm.

Dark Matter is Nonexistent: Revealed by Mathematical error by Eugene J. Laviolette

A book for adult and young geniuses. In the follow up to Eugene J. Laviolette’s book, Dark Matter is Nonexistent, Laviolette further proves his theory with detailed analysis using mathematical calculations. This riveting groundbreaking book will change the way we look at the Universe and the stars. This book is for scientists, theorists, and fans of the stars alike.

The Mystery of Dark Matter: In Search of the Invisible (Astronomers' Universe) by Wolfgang Kapferer

Get ready to embark on the exciting search for dark matter―the invisible mass that dominates our universe. This popular science book explains why this mysterious dark matter has been incorporated into the standard model of the universe and how scientists are able to “observe” the invisible.

The book starts with the early indications of the existence of dark matter, including the strange cohesion of galaxy clusters, before moving on to modern observations like cosmic background radiation. Along the way, you will learn about the direct and indirect methods being used by researchers to track down dark matter and whatever is behind this strange phenomenon.

The Mystery of Dark Matter will appeal to general readers who wish to understand what scientists actually know about dark matter, along with the methods they use to help crack the mystery.

Dark Matter of the Mind: The Culturally Articulated Unconscious by Daniel L. Everett

Is it in our nature to be altruistic, or evil, to make art, use tools, or create language? Is it in our nature to think in any particular way? For Daniel L. Everett, the answer is a resounding no: it isn’t in our nature to do any of these things because human nature does not exist—at least not as we usually think of it. Flying in the face of major trends in Evolutionary Psychology and related fields, he offers a provocative and compelling argument in this book that the only thing humans are hardwired for is freedom: freedom from evolutionary instinct and freedom to adapt to a variety of environmental and cultural contexts.
           

Dark Matter, Dark Energy, Dark Gravity: Enabling a Universe that Supports Intelligent Life by Dr. Stephen C. Perrenod

Dark Matter, Dark Energy and Dark Gravity make life possible! This book for the lay reader provides a summary of the latest astrophysical observational results and theoretical insights into what we know and what we hope to learn about dark matter, dark energy, and dark gravity. How did the profound beauty of our Earth, our Solar System, our Milky Way galaxy and indeed our universe unfold? Dark matter, dark energy, and dark gravity have made all the difference in how the universe has developed, and have been key to creating the overall environment that makes life possible. We have only recently developed the ability to begin unlocking their secrets, thus providing a deeper insight into how a universe of our type is possible. It seems that because of dark matter, dark energy and dark (weak) gravity, our universe has the right attributes for the development of complex structure and the evolution of intelligent life that can engage in the quest to understand our world. These “dark” or more hidden attributes of the cosmos have very good outcomes. 

Dark Matter, Missing Planets and New Comets: Paradoxes Resolved, Origins Illuminated by Tom Van Flandern

Tom Van Flandern’s book adds a new dimension to cosmology–not only does it present a novel approach to timeless issues, it stands up to the closest scientific scrutiny. Even the most respected scientists today will readily admit that the Big Bang Theory is full of holes. But it takes a new look, like Dark Matter, Missing Planets, and New Comets, to explain not only why the theory is wrong but what to substitute in its place. If you are curious about such things as the nature of matter and the origin of the solar system, but feel inadequately equipped to grasp what modern science has to say about such things, read this book. You will not get the all too common condescending attempt to water down the `mysteries’ of modern science into a form intelligible to little non scientist you, but rather a straightforward new theory, logically derived in front of your eyes, which challenges the roots of many of today’s complex accepted paradigms, yet whose essence is simple enough to be thoroughly communicated to the intelligent layman without “losing it in the translation.”

Dark Matter: In Defiance of Catastrophic Modernity: A Fieldguide to Alexander Kluge and Oskar Negt by Richard Langston

Collaborators for more than four decades, lawyer, author, filmmaker, and multimedia artist Alexander Kluge and social philosopher Oskar Negt are an exceptional duo in the history of Critical Theory precisely because their respective disciplines think so differently. Dark Matter argues that what makes their contributions to the Frankfurt School so remarkable is how they think together in spite of these differences. Kluge and Negt’s “gravitational thinking” balances not only the abstractions of theory with the concreteness of the aesthetic, but also their allegiances to Frankfurt School mentors with their fascination for other German, French, and Anglo-American thinkers distinctly outside the Frankfurt tradition.

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