7 Best Books Of Victor Hugo

Books of Victor Hugo: Victor-Marie Hugo was a French poet, novelist, and dramatist of the Romantic movement. During a literary career that spanned more than sixty years. We hope that you enjoy our list of the best Books of Victor Hugo.

Books of Victor Hugo

Les Misérables Dec 28, 2020 by Victor Hugo

The subject of the world’s longest-running musical and the award-winning film, Les Misérables is a genuine literary treasure. Victor Hugo’s tale of injustice, heroism, and love follows the fortunes of Jean Valjean, an escaped convict determined to put his criminal past behind him, and has been a perennial favorite since it first appeared over 150 years ago. This exciting new translation with Jillian Tamaki’s brilliant cover art will be a gift both to readers who have already fallen for its timeless story and to new readers discovering it for the first time.

Selected Poems of Victor Hugo: A Bilingual Edition Paperback – Illustrated, June 1, 2004 by Victor Hugo


Translators E. H. and A. M. Blackmore have collected Victor Hugo’s essential verse into a single, bilingual volume that showcases all the facets of Hugo’s oeuvre, including intimate love poems, satires against the political establishment, serene meditations, religious verse, and narrative poems illustrating his mastery of the art of storytelling and his abiding concern for the social issues of his time. More than half of this volume’s eight thousand lines of verse appear here for the first time in English, providing readers with a new perspective on each of the fascinating periods of Hugo’s career and aspects of his style. Introductions to each section guide the reader through the stages of Hugo’s writing, while notes on individual poems provide information not found in even the most detailed French-language editions.

The Toilers of the Sea (Modern Library Classics) by Victor Hugo , James Hogarth,

A new translation by Scot James Hogarth for the first unabridged English edition of the novel, which tells the story of an illiterate fisherman from the Channel Islands who must free a ship that has run aground in order to win the hand of the woman he loves, a shipowner’s daughter.

The Last Day of a Condemned Man by Victor Hugo , Arabella Ward

“Before hearing my death sentence I was aware that my lungs breathed, that my heart beat, and that my body lived in the community of other men; now, I plainly saw that a barrier had sprung up between them and me. Nothing was the same as before.” The imprisoned narrator of this profoundly moving novel awaits execution — and waits, and waits. Although his guilt is undeniable, his essential humanity emerges as he struggles with the certainty of impending death.
Victor Hugo’s impassioned early work carries the same power and universality as Les Misérables. A vocal opponent to the barbarity of the guillotine, Hugo attempted to arouse compassion in the service of justice. This tale distills his beliefs and offers a highly significant contribution to the ongoing debate over the death penalty. A new Foreword by activist David Dow examines the message and relevance of Hugo’s story to modern society.

Notre-Dame of Paris (The Hunchback of Notre Dame) by Victor Hugo and John Sturrock

In the vaulted Gothic towers of Notre-Dame Cathedral lives Quasimodo, the hunchbacked bellringer. Mocked and shunned for his appearance, he is pitied only by Esmerelda, a beautiful gypsy dancer to whom he becomes completely devoted. Esmerelda, however, has also attracted the attention of the sinister archdeacon Claude Frollo, and when she rejects his lecherous approaches, Frollo hatches a plot to destroy her, that only Quasimodo can prevent. Victor Hugo’s sensational, evocative novel brings life to the medieval Paris he loved, and mourns its passing in one of the greatest historical romances of the nineteenth century.

John Sturrock’s clear, contemporary translation is accompanied by an introduction discussing it as a passionate novel of ideas, written in defence of Gothic architecture and of a burgeoning democracy, and demonstrating that an ugly exterior can conceal moral beauty. This revised edition also includes further reading and a chronology of Hugo’s life.

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The man who Laughs by Victor Hugo

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work.

This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.

Stones to Stains: The Drawings of Victor Hugo by Cynthia Burlingham


Accompanying a major exhibition, this book brings together around 120 of the most significant examples of Victor Hugo’s works on paper. It features previously unpublished drawings and insightful texts that reveal Hugo’s extraordinary talents as a draftsman. Remarkably spontaneous and receptive to the myriad possibilities of medium and materials, Hugo produced experimental and enigmatic compositions, from haunting renditions of castles and ruins to ethereal and abstract forms and stains. This volume includes essays which place Hugo’s drawings within the context of artistic movements in 19th-century France, closely examine his cosmic landscapes and visions of the night, delve into Hugo’s processing of ideas and imagination, and analyze a central pair of opposing forces in his work–stones and stains. This lavishly illustrated book presents the full breadth of Hugo’s talent. Hugo’s drawings afford a greater insight into the creative brilliance that brought forth some of the most indelible stories of all time

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